9. Demolishing the Strongholds: Don’t Neglect God’s Word

for every house is built by someone, but the builder of all things is God. — Hebrews 3:4

November, 2013

Before we acquired the cottage, it sat empty for several years; before that, my mother-in-law had lived here alone as a widow and had difficulty maintaining it. Critters moved in. It’s the country after all, and raccoons used the cat door, mice lived in the cabinets, and hornets made nests in the closets.

So we strapped on our armor this past week: safety glasses, breathing masks, and gloves. We were doing battle against the creatures who have lived and died in our walls. For this particular project the question was, What is dead in the walls of your house?

It’s never pretty, and it isn’t picture-worthy. No one wants to see pictures of mummified mice, decaying nests, dead ladybugs, shriveled hickory nut shells, scat, and spiders. Throw in dirty insulation, rusty nails, and forty-year old newspapers that have been stapled to the walls, and dust, lots and lots of plaster dust…

Lesson learned: If you neglect your house, unwanted creatures will move in to dwell with you.

Reading your Bible every day will fortify you with God’s word. It will keep those unwanted creatures from moving in. Remember the story of the man who swept his house clean and put it in order? The spirit then goes to find seven other spirits more wicked than itself, they all move in, and the final condition of the man is worse than the first. (Luke 11:24-26) This will not happen if you are immersed daily in God’s word.


I have tried to stop dithering about what is to be done next and just go with what is. Everything we do to this old cottage is an improvement, so does it matter if one project (the kitchen) isn’t quite finished before we start the next? Or, more accurately, does it matter how many rooms are torn up in the effort to finish them all? We currently have gutted (and not finished) the mudroom, the living room, the dining room, and the kitchen. There are messes everywhere: plaster dust, tools, tarps. Not only does the armor get uncomfortable fast–(safety glasses fog up, hands sweat in gloves, it’s hard to breathe through those masks) –but there is nowhere to go in the house that is a respite from the messes. Sometimes it seems as though we will never get finished.

Lesson learned: Demolish the strongholds of ugly stuff today; the longer you wait, the bigger the job. 

In 2 Corinthians 10, Paul is defending his ministry to the Corinthians. He tells them that he has divine powers to fight the ways of the world and demolish its strongholds. And what is that divine power? Is it something only the apostles had access to? He says in verse 5: “We demolish arguments and every pretension that sets itself up against the knowledge of God, and we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ.” The New Living Translation puts it this way: “We destroy every proud obstacle that keeps people from knowing God. We capture their rebellious thoughts and teach them to obey Christ. We all have access to this divine power Paul speaks of — it is God’s word, prayer, faith and the Spirit inside us. We get to know God by reading his Word. Listening to it. Studying it. Taking captive every thought and making it obedient to Christ, the living Word.


We thought we would be doing this cottage one room at a time. It’s easier to manage that way; it’s easier to think about one room at a time. But the inter-connectedness of the wiring, walls, roofline, ceilings–all makes that impossible to do. And I’m trying to be okay with that.

There are holes in the mudroom walls that go into the living room. An air conditioner was once there; a log box for storage and easy access for fireplace logs was once there too. Now they are just gaping holes that have to be repaired. Wiring is another issue. The wiring in the living room is just hodge-podged up there and has to be replaced. The electric panel is in the mudroom, and right now, with those holes between the two rooms, it is a perfect time to rewire the living room too.

When we bought the window for the mudroom a few weeks ago, we also ordered a new series of windows for the living room. (Can’t pass up a sale on Anderson windows!) In order to take out the large window in the living room to replace it, we had to take off the current trim and a bit of the old paneling. Once we had some of the paneling off, there was a terrible stench. We have had bad smells at this place pretty often; we have torn up carpet, peeled off wallpaper, and scrubbed walls to get rid of smells. This one was very bad, so we had to keep tearing out to find the root of the evil, er…the smell.

We are now down to bare studs on the living room wall. (We were hoping this wasn’t the plan…) But three dead mice later, the smell is gone. So now insulation is a necessity too.

Lesson learned: Every part of a house is interconnected and can’t be dealt with one room at a time.

Your spiritual life is connected to every other part of your life. God is everywhere in the world and in your life, and if you neglect Him here, then over there it won’t be working so well either. What are you neglecting? The Word? Prayer? Worship? Quiet Time? Those are the most common ways to converse with God. One point I love to remember is that God made us for community with Him. He yearns for conversations with us. Not because He needs us; not because He doesn’t know what we need; but because a relationship with Him is the most vital thing we can do in this life. This relationship with God works both ways: God made us to yearn for Him too. The Psalmist says, “My soul yearns, even faints for the courts of the Lord; my heart and my flesh cry out for the living God.” (Psalm 84:2) He loves us with a perfect love. We can never match it; we can never measure up. But every time it crosses our minds just how much He loves us, we can offer Him a thank you song, a thankful prayer. I don’t know how it is with you, but the more I am grateful, the more I am likely to take up my Bible and read. The more I am reading my Bible, the more I am likely to pray. 

When we can be thankful for His grace and mercy in our physical life, our spiritual and emotional lives feel His presence too. He has given us this interconnected life so that every part of us need Him. We worship Him with our hearts, our minds, our voices, our souls, our bodies — with every part of our being and with everything we do. Be and Do. With every thought captive to Christ.

I was planning on writing an essay on the finishing of the kitchen, but it will just have to wait. And that’s okay too. After all, the whole cottage has to be finished for us to get featured on “This Old House”.  🙂


For further study, read 2 Corinthians 10.

Questions to think about:

  • What part of your spiritual life is being neglected in this season of your life? 
  • Be and Do was mentioned above. That means not only our behaviors but also our thoughts. I don’t know about you, but my behaviors aren’t usually the worst of me–it’s my mind and stupid thoughts I need help with. Knowing scripture can help with this thought control, yes? I’m thinking of Romans 12:2; what are some others?
  • In 2 Corinthians 10:5 Paul tells us “we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ” What does this mean? Can the inner thoughts of a person come out in their actions?
  • What are some other ways to get control over disabling thoughts and demolish strongholds? (Read Romans 12:9-21)
  • I wrote “sometimes it seems as though we will never get finished…” Our journey with Jesus sometimes feels hopeless like that when we dwell on ourselves and our shortcomings, rather than dwelling on Him and what He has done. We sinners can take Hope-full and make it hope-less in an instant. If we could just learn to dwell in Jesus… How do you do this? Be specific.